In Season: More Baby Brussels Sprouts

sept-food-006I know it wasn’t long ago that I blogged about the baby Brussels sprouts I found at the farmers market.  Well, those cavolini are incredibly hard to resist, so I picked up another container when I was there over the weekend.  Since they got rave reviews even from my children (yes, I did just say that my children like Brussels sprouts), I figured they’d be an winning side dish for weekend grilling.

This time, I decided to flavor them a little differently.  Previously, I embellished with Parmesan and pine nuts…but this time I spotted a cylinder of basil butter in my freezer I’d prepared awhile back and knew that it would be the perfect addition to my dish.  I simply placed the washed Brussels sprouts onto a square of tin foil, added a few coin-sized slices of basil butter, and popped the entire packet onto the grates next to the butterflied whole chicken I was grilling.  Since I’d also picked up a bunch of fresh basil at the market (my own pot on the patio was ruined by too much rain), I decided I’d garnish with a little chiffonade as well. 

 

Cavolini with Basil Butter

2 cups baby Brussels sprouts, washed and cut in half if desired

 Foil

2-3   1/4″ thick medallions of basil butter (recipe below)

1-2 tablespoons fresh basil, cut into thin strips

salt

Preheat grill to medium-high.

Place Brussels sprouts, basil butter, and salt on the foil, and cover with another piece of foil.  Crimp edges to seal and form a packet.

Place packet on grill grates and cook for approximately 15 minutes.

Transfer cooked sprouts into a bowl and top with fresh basil.

Basil Butter

Makes 2 logs

1 stick unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2 cup loosely packed basil leaves

1-2 cloves garlic  (or 2 frozen garlic cubes, thawed)

salt to taste

Place the basil and garlic into the work bowl of the food processor and pulse until minced. 

Add softened butter and process until incorporated.  Add salt to taste (about 1/2 teaspoon).  Pulse again. 

Using 2 squares of plastic wrap, form into logs, twist ends to seal, and freeze for up to 6 months.

Click here for more information about Tracy’s Connecticut cooking classes, or to read her The Secret Ingredient Blog.

Advertisements

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: